Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament

Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament

Reviews:

Wray's lively and well-written presentation of the women of the Old Testament will make readers wonder how they could have overlooked these extraordinary women and their stories. And for once, the good girls are as complex and interesting as the bad ones. Wray shows how these stories will not permit any simple moralizing about these women. Their own struggles to survive and flourish in a world often stacked against them truly provide 'enduring lessons' for women attempting to make sense of their lives today.

Sherri Brown, Creighton University

T. J. Wray presents twelve stories of New Testament 'good girls and bad girls' in a style that readers will find both engaging and edifying. Wray's studies, although anchored in careful scholarship, are never pedantic and her challenging reflections are aimed at prompting lively discussions and deeper appreciation for these exceptional women of the Bible.

Robin M. Jensen, Patrick O'Brien Professor of Theology, University of Notre Dame

Some of the women in Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament are household names like Mary Magdalene, some have little-known names like Tabitha, and some have no name at all, like the forever-anonymous woman at the well. Whether they have a name or not makes no difference. T. J. Wray draws at least one lesson to remember from each of the stories of the women upon whom she gazes with a scholar's and mother's eye.

Raymond F. Collins, Brown University

Informed by solid scholarship, this is an eminently readable introduction to the women of the New Testament for students and general readers alike. It is filled with colorful accounts that bring these women to life, drawing thought-provoking parallels to our own day. The picture is fascinating and complex—frequently challenging our assumptions about the lives of these ancient women.

Margaret Y. MacDonald, Saint Mary's University


Book Description

Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament takes readers on a powerful journey through the vast landscape of Roman-occupied Judea during the first century and the genesis of Christianity. This landscape serves as the backdrop for twelve amazing stories of women whose paths intersect, either by providence or design, with the paths of Jesus or Paul. Some of these women are familiar, such as Mary, the mother of Jesus, while others, like the wife of the infamous Pontius Pilate, are lesser known. Whether she is popular or obscure, good or bad, each woman's story is an important part of the overall Christian narrative.

Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament invites readers to take a more nuanced look at twelve stories that feature women, to explore their lives more deeply in historical context, and to understand the real story that includes both men and women. The book goes beyond simply telling the story of a particular biblical woman to challenge readers to explore the enduring lessons the ancient writers sought to impart. These timeless lessons are as important for us today as they were thousands of years ago.